Scotland – Kansas City Animal Health Corridor

Anyone working or remotely associated with the animal health care industry will know about the Kansas City Animal Health Corridor. It is the hub for animal health organizations located in the North American region and accounts for more than 80% of the animal health care revenue generated by North America on a yearly basis. It provides you with a favorable business environment by creating a platform to interact and collaborate with the best of industry experts which will help in the company’s holistic growth. While this is the North American scenario, similar developments in Scotland are being set in motion to make it a hub for animal healthcare in Europe.

Scotland has initiated the framework to make it an ideal location for animal health care and aquaculture research. Demographically, Scotland is the ideal location for aquaculture research. 50% of the UK veterinary spending is offered to Scotland. The ample natural resources available for the industry to prosper is one of the major initiating factors for Scotland to establish itself as the hub for animal health research. Scotland is also home to over 1000 researchers who are focusing on animal health care primarily. According to the Scottish Government, The Roslin Institute has helped generate annual productivity gains of £247 million through its breeding and genetics research. Most of the vaccines for sheep and cattle respiratory problems were first developed in Scotland, which then were used in other parts of the world. The abundance of proper skilled labor, high infrastructure and immense scope for Research and Development coupled with the strong links to food producers are factors which justify the promotion made by the Scottish Government to make its nation the European hub for animal health care and aquaculture market.

Scotland is also a home for a number of innovative companies involved in the field of Animal health care and research. One such company which holds a reputation all around the globe is Benchmark Holdings subsidiary, The Fish Vet Group. The company started as a small organization providing veterinary services to the fish farming operations on the coast of Scotland has gradually grown into as the world leader in aquatic health services. It is fair to say that this company has thrived under the favorable demographics and conditions offered by Scotland, acting as a prime example for the potential and promise Scotland holds as a leading location for animal health care market to bloom. The Fish Vet group offers services in Veterinary healthcare, diagnostics and environmental aspects. They have recently been in the news for expanding their operations with new offices in Thailand (Asia), one of the biggest aquaculture markets in the world. They have been able to attract the best researchers involved in the field of animal healthcare and diagnostics to work for their organization. The recent inclusion of the world-renowned Salmonid health specialist Dr. Marian McLoughlin to their list of researchers speaks volumes of their reputation. Their main products include medication for the prevention and treatment of Salice infestation and other aquaculture specific diseases. The acquisition of the Ireland based Vet Aqua International in 2013 has restored their position as market leader in the aquaculture market. Their presence previously confined only to the Scottish region has expanded internationally to the USA, Ireland, Norway and Thailand, all hot prospects, poised to strengthen their hold on the Global Animal Health Care market.

The governance changes in Scotland acted as a catalyst in the growth of The Fish Vet Group’s business globally by providing the resources needed to thrive in the market. Market players can take note of this example. With the animal health market in demand for the next few years, it can be said Scotland can be considered the ideal location for new market players who are eager to excel in the animal health market. It will also be beneficial to the already existing players to open their business at Scotland as it has a lot to offer to say the least.

Talking Mental Health In College- Q & A with Richard Kadison, M.D. of Harvard University

Maria Pascucci, president of Campus Calm, had the opportunity to talk with Richard Kadison, M.D., about why high schools and colleges are seeing a rise in the number of stressed-out students battling mental health problems. Kadison is the chief of the Mental Health Service at Harvard University Health Services and author of College of the Overwhelmed: The Campus Mental Health Crisis and What to Do About It. Kadison has specialized in campus mental health and student mental health treatment throughout his career.

Campus Calm: Why are college campuses seeing a rise in the number of students with mental health issues?

Kadison: There are lots of reasons we’re seeing a rise in the number of students with mental health issues. We’re seeing more students who get diagnosed with serious problems in high school and they’re functioning well enough to get to college. That’s one group. I think there is the millennial group of students with what are described as helicopter parents who hover over them, and basically make decisions for them. You know the old metaphor about teaching people to fish instead of getting them fish. I think there’s a lot of handing out of fish that goes on in high school. Kids are also being shuttled from one activity to another, kind of building their college resume and not having much down time and not really feeling passionate about things.

Campus Calm: How big of a part does the lack of sleep, eating right and exercising play in students being stressed out?

Kadison: The lack of sleep, I think, is a huge issue. College students are sleeping an average of 6 1/2 hours each night and they definitely experience symptoms of sleep deprivation, which screws up their immune systems, impairs their academic functioning and makes them more susceptible to depression and bipolar disorder.

Exercise is another huge issue. There’s good evidence for milder forms of depression, four days of 30 minutes of cardiovascular exercise works as well as antidepressant medication. A lot of students get busy, stop exercising and eating healthy, get more depressed, have more difficulty getting their work done, then start stressing out and have more difficulty sleeping. They get into this vicious cycle.

Campus Calm: How much of a part does perfectionism play in the lives of stressed-out students? How does Harvard’s counseling center deal with academic perfectionism amongst students?

Kadison: That’s certainly a big issue here and I would say, most elite schools. I talked to the directors of the other ivies. There are two major thrusts. I would say one is trying to create some balance in students’ lives. They need to take care of themselves. Working all the time is not the best way to live. Having conversations with them about excellence versus perfection and working hard and trying to focus. But no one test, no one course, no one situation is going to make or break your life. Lives take twists and turns that none of us expect.

Number one: you need to learn how to be resilient. Number two: learn some techniques and skills to manage stress because what you have in high school and college isn’t going to change once you get out into the real world.

Campus Calm: Whom do you see more of: overachieving guys or girls? Is it true that women seek help more than young men? Why or why not?

Kadison: In terms of more women seeking care, I think probably that’s because women are more tuned into their emotions. There’s less stigma. I don’t think the numbers are different — it’s just that men aren’t always wise enough to come in to talk to some one about it.

Campus Calm: How do you work to help students find meaningful ways to base their identities beyond grades & awards?

Kadison: That’s exactly the challenge. It’s people figuring out who they are — we all have faults, we all make mistakes and we all do things we wish we hadn’t done. The key is really to get to know yourself, figure out how to accept yourself and do the best that you can. Getting students outwardly focused, again in balance, so that they’re engaged in their community. There’s growing evidence that the more students are doing something to help their community, like working with high school kids, or volunteering somewhere, those students have much more satisfactory experiences in college than students who are completely self-focused. It’s creating an environment where that’s really encouraged and rewarded.

Campus Calm: Do you think that our current academic culture allows kids to learn how to make mistakes and fail safely?

Kadison: Well, I think part of the process is really the education of the whole community. It’s not just the students. We try to do outreach activities and provide consultations to faculty, staff and residential staff. The reality is though, if the culture in the lab is that the professor is in the lab until 3 a.m., and expects everyone else to be there until 3 a.m., that’s not a healthy message for students.

I think mental health advocacy groups are a good idea because students listen to other students more than other professional adults. Having advocacy groups so students can hear that getting depressed in college is nothing to be ashamed of and it’s very treatable if you come and talk to someone about it.

Campus Calm: Is an Ivy League education always the best way to reach success?

Kadison: I think that students can get a great education at any school. There’s students who come here to Harvard and don’t get a great education because it’s a bad fit for them. Being around other bright people who are totally focused on their academics doesn’t help them learn how to create any kind of balance in their lives. That leads to a disappointment.

Campus Calm: So many students see straight A’s and other academic achievements as stepping stones that will lead them to a good college, which will lead them to a good graduate school, then to a good job and, ultimately, a happy life. Does our society put too much emphasis on this one path to happiness and prosperity?

Kadison: As far as students seeing grades as stepping-stones, I think that’s true. There’s some reality in there and it’s also a problem. I think to some degree this is up to the college admissions folks, that leading a balanced life and being engaged in your community is just as important as being successful academically. Doing other things that you feel passionate about.

Technological Advancement in Health Communication in Less Developed Countries

Direct communication in health care can take place via forms of social media such as Skype, zoom and video conferencing. Traditional forms of communication such as telephone, notes and letters can continue to be used for information sharing between health providers and patients. For example, doctors and patients can text and send messages to one another. It is imperative that social media messaging be used to reduce the time taken to obtain knowledge on patient condition and general wellbeing.

The use of social media communication tools should not make indirect communication obsolete. In instances of technology resistance and lack of access to social media, health providers will be required to communicate face to face with patients and their relatives. Sometimes it may be easier and faster to communicate with patients via other media such as third parties. Doctors and patients can communicate via third parties such as nurses, personal caregivers, family and relatives of patients who may be unable to communicate. In other instances, it may be advantageous for family or caregivers to inform patients of their condition. A spouse or parent may be empathetic in conveying negative news to patients.

As a small island developing nation, Trinidad and Tobago faces serious health challenges that can be minimized by appropriate investment in social media technology. The major challenges include shortage of ambulances, bed shortages, and acute shortage of highly specialized medical knowledge and practice. Three additional acute problems are hospital overcrowding, limited availability of biomedical technology and drug shortages. These problems are exacerbated by traffic congestion that results from poor road infrastructure. Health and infrastructural challenges often combine to impact the quality of healthcare for patients with limited access to health facilities negatively.

This paper proposes that the quality of patient care for less critically ill patients can be enhanced by the adoption of social media tools that will enable doctors and other health providers to see and hear their patients in remote sites such as specialized care facilities and patient residences. The main intention of social media usage is to reduce overcrowding, improve access to healthcare, promote effective pain management and reduce patient death or mortality. Many patients can be released from hospital and be cared for at convalescent and private homes where providers can monitor and evaluate their progress via Skype, video conferencing, zoom or other appropriate technology.

The state can promote technological advancement and innovation to make social media tools widely accessible, highly reliable and very efficient. Investment in innovation should lead to the introduction of local media technology that can enhance the phenomenon of multiple users at the same time. For instance, doctors, pharmacists, nurses and other health providers should be able to interface simultaneously in order to ensure patients receive the best care. The doctor will maintain the primary provider role but should be able to take advice from other providers who may spend more communication time with patients. Finally after health providers have attained a position of consensus on the way forward, patients and their relatives can be brought in to ensure that the agreed treatment plan is explained and understood. The patient will become the biggest beneficiary of a collaborative approach among health providers. He will receive faster, more efficient care from a multidisciplinary team of healthcare providers.

Technology should enable patient surveillance in a virtual setting that should reduce the time and hazards of taking weak and incapacitated patients to a hospital or care facility. In addition, providers can give safe and efficient care to patients who are in remote locations. It also means that patients warded at hospital would benefit from more direct contact with health providers who would have more time to spend with them. One advantage that cannot be underscored is the learning that will accrue from evidence based practice. Health professionals can learn from one another and develop innovative collaborative approaches to healthcare. Patients will receive consistent instruction or advice from health professionals. Use of social media technology in health care will also enable patients to have sessions with health providers individually. The use of electronic health records will enhance patient care tremendously. Health providers will be able to access patient information faster and easier thus reducing the time taken to care for patients.

Technological advancement must be accompanied by cultural change. The biggest change, technology acceptance, should ensure that resistance to technology is reduced. Change must bring about significant gains in patient education in order that they become more responsible for their overall health. Patient empowerment programs must be implemented to provide greater patient self efficacy. In other words, patients must be able to diagnose partially, monitor and evaluate changes in their physical and mental health. They must be able to detect significant health changes and be able to relate them to factors such as diet, changes in their physical environment and general increases in emotional, mental and psychological stress. The overarching goal is to enable doctors to make faster, more accurate, diagnoses of patient health problems.

This paper recognizes the limitation of social media technology such as technological failure or malfunction,. However, this challenge can be overcome by putting the required personnel in place to respond quickly to it. More importantly, this paper purports that systemic problems such as bed and ambulance shortages will be reduced significantly by the use of social media technology to care for patients who do not require hospitalization or critical care.