The Cost Of A Worthless Degree From California State University Just Got More Costly

Inflation has been all but non-existent during the Obama Years, yet you wouldn’t know that looking at the increase of College/University Tuition at the State Level, especially in California. Students are told in High School that college is mandatory to have a fruitful life and live in the elusive middle class, and are told to go into debt to get that degree (more like economic enslavement) with no guarantee. Most of the college professors and administrators are in the 2%, no not the 1% but well ahead of what their students should ever expect to get to. Let’s talk, because the academic bubble is still building and its about to pop – things have gotten way out of hand.

There was a rather troubling segment on ABC News Affiliate in Los Angeles (Eyewitness News 7) recently titled: “CSU Trustees Vote to Raise Tuition by 5% Amid Protest From Students” on March 22, 2017.

First, I’d like to point out that the education hasn’t gotten any better at the California State University System, by all measures and accounts it has gotten worse. Degreed Students are valued less in the marketplace, as employers realize their education isn’t as good, and that those degrees don’t predict the students will be productive employees or even have a clue as to what they are doing.

Most professors, especially tenured professors are not teaching in the classroom much, as they spend lots of time on sabbaticals, and have grad students lecturing now. The increased costs of the university has to do with legacy costs (Pensions) and increase healthcare Cadillac Style Health Care Programs for staff and professors. Although their pension fund is not as bad as the University of California System which highly underfunded, it isn’t breaking any records either – this Trump Bump in the stock market recently has saved their asses (temporarily) if you’d like to know the true skinny on that.

It’s time to face facts – The CSU system (California State University) is broken, academia is broken close the damn universities who give degrees in Gender Studies, Sustainability, Ethnic Equality, LBGT Studies – those kids aren’t going to get work to ever pay off those student loans – academia is on drugs by any rational observable standard – worthless – totally worthless surviving off of Federal Research Grants and Taxpayers and extortion tuition, subsidies and socialist agendas. Some at our think tank online, to put it quite bluntly, say; “To hell with all of it, it’s just BS now,” and I believe these think tank members are absolutely correct.

Why the 5% increase in tuition when enrollment is at an all-time high? Why the increase in tuition without increased benefits? The degrees aren’t worth any more than they were last year, in fact they are worth less now. The California State University System is out-of-control just like the University of California System is, and academia across the country is with student loan debt hovering at 1.4 Trillion Dollars, 45% of those loans have never made a single payment or are 90-days overdue. The academic industrial complex is a giant bubble about to burst, and what does the CSU system do? Raise tuition? Oh, well that’s just going to help a lot lot… NOT!

Florida Gulf Coast University – Southwest Florida’s Emerging Institution

Florida Gulf Coast University, or FGCU, is one of the newest universities to make its debut in academe, opening its doors in August 1996.  Much of the impetus behind its incorporation was the overwhelming desire of Southwest Florida residents to host a world-class university in their midst. Not surprisingly, the allure of a mild climate, lots of sunshine and nearby beaches has helped FGCU more than double its student enrollments every year since inception to more than 10,000 students for 2008-09.  In an era of college educations that cost upwards of $40,000 a year in tuition, FGCU is a relative bargain with out-of-state annual tuition averaging $17K.

Located on 760 acres in the heart of Southwest Florida, FGCU has carefully mapped out its location to maximize the surrounding wildlife and nature preserves and offer a “living laboratory” to students, faculty, and alumnae.  True to this mission, FGCU is heralded as one of the most ecologically sound campuses in North America.  The University recently purchased waterfront property in Bonita Springs with the intention of developing a marine research laboratory to further capitalize on its coastal location and the abundance of marine and bird life.

A co-ed institution, FGCU is four-year with accreditation to award associate, bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral degrees.  As of the fall of 2008, the University offers 51 undergraduate and 31 graduate degree programs in Arts and Sciences, Business, Education, and Health Professions. With the plethora of resorts and restaurants in the region, the Resort and Hospitality Management program is one of the more popular majors.  Students can participate in an active internship program at some of the world’s premier resorts located just minutes from campus.  Biology and criminal justice are also growing programs.  The Division of Justice Studies is in its first year of offering a Master of Science in Criminal Forensic Studies, paving the way for future CSI investigators.

Students praise the small class sizes and individual attention with an 18:1 teacher/student ratio at the undergraduate level. FGCU is also one of the most technologically advanced campuses in the world with a campus-wide high-speed Internet network.  Classrooms all feature fully equipped multimedia instructional systems that include Internet access, cameras and audio and video presentation capabilities.   Capitalizing on its expertise, FGCU has hosted an Informational Technology (IT) forum for the past eight years, connecting area experts with MBA students in Germany.

While many students barely tolerate dorm or off-campus living during their college years, the 2,400 students who live in FGCU campus housing enjoy a comparatively luxurious existence.  Residences are apartment-style, completely furnished and wired for high-speed Internet access.  Full-size kitchens, spacious living rooms overlooking the lake, and automated laundry facilities are additional touches that give new meaning to the college experience.  Other amenities include a swimming pool, barbecue areas, beach volleyball, and easy access to lake water sports.

Athletics are an increasingly large part of the FGCU program and encompass baseball, men’s basketball, men’s golf, men’s soccer, men’s tennis, softball, volleyball, women’s basketball, women’s cross country, women’s golf, women’s soccer, women’s swimming and diving, and women’s tennis, among others. The women’s teams have performed especially well, despite the newness of the programs with the women’s basketball team ending their 35-1 season with a loss in the Division II National Championship.  As of the 2007-2008 academic year, FGCU moved to Division I sports.

Despite its sunny climate and laid-back atmosphere, FGCU offers a solid classroom experience.  While students can take courses in paradise, graduates are well prepared to excel in today’s tech-savvy and increasingly green environment.

Talking Mental Health In College- Q & A with Richard Kadison, M.D. of Harvard University

Maria Pascucci, president of Campus Calm, had the opportunity to talk with Richard Kadison, M.D., about why high schools and colleges are seeing a rise in the number of stressed-out students battling mental health problems. Kadison is the chief of the Mental Health Service at Harvard University Health Services and author of College of the Overwhelmed: The Campus Mental Health Crisis and What to Do About It. Kadison has specialized in campus mental health and student mental health treatment throughout his career.

Campus Calm: Why are college campuses seeing a rise in the number of students with mental health issues?

Kadison: There are lots of reasons we’re seeing a rise in the number of students with mental health issues. We’re seeing more students who get diagnosed with serious problems in high school and they’re functioning well enough to get to college. That’s one group. I think there is the millennial group of students with what are described as helicopter parents who hover over them, and basically make decisions for them. You know the old metaphor about teaching people to fish instead of getting them fish. I think there’s a lot of handing out of fish that goes on in high school. Kids are also being shuttled from one activity to another, kind of building their college resume and not having much down time and not really feeling passionate about things.

Campus Calm: How big of a part does the lack of sleep, eating right and exercising play in students being stressed out?

Kadison: The lack of sleep, I think, is a huge issue. College students are sleeping an average of 6 1/2 hours each night and they definitely experience symptoms of sleep deprivation, which screws up their immune systems, impairs their academic functioning and makes them more susceptible to depression and bipolar disorder.

Exercise is another huge issue. There’s good evidence for milder forms of depression, four days of 30 minutes of cardiovascular exercise works as well as antidepressant medication. A lot of students get busy, stop exercising and eating healthy, get more depressed, have more difficulty getting their work done, then start stressing out and have more difficulty sleeping. They get into this vicious cycle.

Campus Calm: How much of a part does perfectionism play in the lives of stressed-out students? How does Harvard’s counseling center deal with academic perfectionism amongst students?

Kadison: That’s certainly a big issue here and I would say, most elite schools. I talked to the directors of the other ivies. There are two major thrusts. I would say one is trying to create some balance in students’ lives. They need to take care of themselves. Working all the time is not the best way to live. Having conversations with them about excellence versus perfection and working hard and trying to focus. But no one test, no one course, no one situation is going to make or break your life. Lives take twists and turns that none of us expect.

Number one: you need to learn how to be resilient. Number two: learn some techniques and skills to manage stress because what you have in high school and college isn’t going to change once you get out into the real world.

Campus Calm: Whom do you see more of: overachieving guys or girls? Is it true that women seek help more than young men? Why or why not?

Kadison: In terms of more women seeking care, I think probably that’s because women are more tuned into their emotions. There’s less stigma. I don’t think the numbers are different — it’s just that men aren’t always wise enough to come in to talk to some one about it.

Campus Calm: How do you work to help students find meaningful ways to base their identities beyond grades & awards?

Kadison: That’s exactly the challenge. It’s people figuring out who they are — we all have faults, we all make mistakes and we all do things we wish we hadn’t done. The key is really to get to know yourself, figure out how to accept yourself and do the best that you can. Getting students outwardly focused, again in balance, so that they’re engaged in their community. There’s growing evidence that the more students are doing something to help their community, like working with high school kids, or volunteering somewhere, those students have much more satisfactory experiences in college than students who are completely self-focused. It’s creating an environment where that’s really encouraged and rewarded.

Campus Calm: Do you think that our current academic culture allows kids to learn how to make mistakes and fail safely?

Kadison: Well, I think part of the process is really the education of the whole community. It’s not just the students. We try to do outreach activities and provide consultations to faculty, staff and residential staff. The reality is though, if the culture in the lab is that the professor is in the lab until 3 a.m., and expects everyone else to be there until 3 a.m., that’s not a healthy message for students.

I think mental health advocacy groups are a good idea because students listen to other students more than other professional adults. Having advocacy groups so students can hear that getting depressed in college is nothing to be ashamed of and it’s very treatable if you come and talk to someone about it.

Campus Calm: Is an Ivy League education always the best way to reach success?

Kadison: I think that students can get a great education at any school. There’s students who come here to Harvard and don’t get a great education because it’s a bad fit for them. Being around other bright people who are totally focused on their academics doesn’t help them learn how to create any kind of balance in their lives. That leads to a disappointment.

Campus Calm: So many students see straight A’s and other academic achievements as stepping stones that will lead them to a good college, which will lead them to a good graduate school, then to a good job and, ultimately, a happy life. Does our society put too much emphasis on this one path to happiness and prosperity?

Kadison: As far as students seeing grades as stepping-stones, I think that’s true. There’s some reality in there and it’s also a problem. I think to some degree this is up to the college admissions folks, that leading a balanced life and being engaged in your community is just as important as being successful academically. Doing other things that you feel passionate about.